Publications

World Bank

Stitches to Riches?: Apparel Employment, Trade, and Economic Development in South Asia

2016   |    Gladys Lopez-Acevedo, Raymond Robertson, Stacey Frederick, Atisha Kumar

CGGC's Stacey Frederick authored chapters 2 and 5 in this World Bank book on the apparel industry. The book is motivated by South Asia's need to create more and better jobs for a growing population; it investigates the region's potential for expanding and improving jobs in the labor-intensive apparel sector. It estimates the effects of rising wages in China on apparel exports, employment, and wages in South Asia, and provides policy recommendations to leverage the sector for greater job creation.

Washington, DC: World Bank: Chapter 2, Benchmarking South Asia in the Global Apparel Industry, p. 39-76; Chapter 5, Policies to Foster Apparel Exports and Jobs, p. 143-177   View Book PDF   View World Bank page

Risks and Opportunities of Participation in Global Value Chains

2014   |    Gary Gereffi, Xubei Luo

Contemporary globalization has been marked by significant shifts in the organization and governance of global industries. In the 1970s and 1980s, one such shift was characterized by the emergence of buyer-driven and producer-driven commodity chains. In the early 2000s, a more differentiated typology of governance structures was introduced, which focused on new types of coordination in global value chains (GVCs). Today the organization of the global economy is entering another phase, with transformations that are reshaping the governance structures of both GVCs and global capitalism at various levels: (1) the end of the Washington Consensus and the rise of contending centers of economic and political power; (2) a combination of geographic consolidation and value chain concentration in the global supply base, which, in some cases, is shifting bargaining power from lead firms in GVCs to large suppliers in developing economies; (3) new patterns of strategic coordination among value chain actors; (4) a shift in the end markets of many GVCs accelerated by the economic crisis of 2008–09, which is redefining regional geographies of investment and trade; and (5) a diffusion of the GVC approach to major international donor agencies, which is prompting a reformulation of established development paradigms.

World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 6847  View PDF

Making Foreign Direct Investment Work for Sub-Saharan Africa: Chapter 7: Sector Case Study: Apparel

2014   |    Cornelia Staritz, Stacey Frederick

Foreign direct investment (FDI) is becoming an increasingly significant catalyst for output and trade in developing countries, in part due to a major expansion in the scope of global value chains (GVCs). FDI delivers a number of important contributions to economic development in terms of investment, employment, and foreign exchange.

Making Foreign Direct Investment Work for Sub-Saharan Africa: Local Spillovers and Competitiveness in Global Value Chains Pp. 209-244 in T. Farole and D. Winkler (eds.), Washington, DC: The World Bank.  View Publisher's Website   View Book PDF

Joining, Upgrading and Being Competitive in Global Value Chains

2013   |    Olivier Cattaneo, Garry Gereffi, Sebastien Miroudot, Daria Taglioni

In recent years, global value chains have played an increasing role in business strategies, profoundly affecting international trade and development paradigms. Global value chains now represent a major source of socio-upgrading opportunities and a new path for development. Trade, competitiveness and development policies should be reshaped accordingly to seize these opportunities and avoid the risks associated with greater participation in global value chains. This paper provides a framework and analytical tools for measuring and improving a country’s performance with respect to participation in global value chains.

World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 6406  View PDF

Global Value Chains, Economic Upgrading and Gender: Case Studies of the Horticulture, Tourism, and Call Center Industries

2013   |    Penny Bamber, Karina Fernandez-Stark, Ghada Ahmed, Michelle Christian

This book provides an analysis of the horticulture, tourism, and call center global value chains (GVCs) based on a survey of the literature and case studies carried out in Honduras (horticulture), Kenya (tourism), and Egypt (call centers). The studies show that GVCs and their upgrading dynamics have important gender dimensions, and that integration and upgrading are influenced by, and have an impact on, gender relations.

World Bank Book Cornelia Staritz and José Guilherme Reis (eds.)  View Book   View Blog Post

Beyond the Annual Budget: Global Experience with Medium-Term Expenditure Frameworks (Case Studies)

2013   |    Ghada Ahmed

Ghada Ahmed was a contributor to the case studies on Ghana and South Africa in the appendices of the book.

  Read More  View PDF

Developments in the Global Apparel Industry after the MFA Phaseout and Summaries of the Country Case Studies (Part 2)

2012   |    Stacey Frederick, Cornelia Staritz

The chapter introduces dynamics in the global apparel value chain with a focus on the impacts of the lifting of the Multi-fibre Arrangement on Textiles and Clothing (MFA/ATC) and the global economic crisis in nine countries. A detailed analysis of each country is in Part 2 of this book.

Sewing Success? Employment, Wages, and Poverty following the End of the Multi-fibre Arrangement Pp. 41-86 and pp. 211-497 in G. Lopez-Acevedo & R. Robertson (Eds.), Washington, DC: The World Bank   View PDF   View Publisher's Website

Upgrading and Restructuring in the Global Apparel Value Chain: Why China and Asia are Outperforming Mexico and Central America

2011   |    Stacey Frederick, Gary Gereffi

This article uses the global value chain approach to analyze the upgrading trajectories of leading apparel exporters adapting to the end of textile and apparel quotas and the economic recession.

International Journal Technological Learning, Innovation and Development Vol. 4, No. 1/2/3, p. 67-95  View Publisher's Website  View Special Issue

The Offshore Services Value Chain: Upgrading Trajectories in Developing Countries

2011   |    Karina Fernandez-Stark, Penny Bamber, Gary Gereffi

International Journal Technological Learning, Innovation and Development Vol. 4, No. 1/2/3, 206-234  View Publisher's Website  View Special Issue

Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective

2010   |    Editors: Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi, Cornelia Staritz

World Bank Book Cover Washington, DC: The World Bank   View Book   View Publisher's Website


The Global Apparel Value Chain, Trade and the Crisis: Challenges and Opportunities for Developing Countries

2010   |    Gary Gereffi, Stacey Frederick

Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective. Washington, DC: The World Bank. Pp. 157-208 in Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi and Cornelia Staritz (eds.)  View Book

The Offshore Services Value Chain: Developing Countries and the Crisis

2010   |    Gary Gereffi, Karina Fernandez-Stark

Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective. Washington, DC: The World Bank. Pp. 335-372 in Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi and Cornelia Staritz (eds.)  View Book

Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: Resilience, Consolidation, and Shifting End Markets

2010   |    Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi, Cornelia Staritz

Global Value Chains in a Postcrisis World: A Development Perspective. Washington, DC: The World Bank. Pp. 3-20 in Olivier Cattaneo, Gary Gereffi and Cornelia Staritz (eds.)  View Book

Review and Analysis of Protectionist Actions in the Textile and Apparel Industries

2009   |    Stacey Frederick, Gary Gereffi

The Fateful Allure of Protectionism: Taking Stock for the G8 Pp. 65-68 in Simon Evenett, Bernard Hoekman, and Olivier Cattaneo (eds.) Washington, DC and London: The World Bank and the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Protectionism in Textiles and Apparel

2009   |    Stacey Frederick, Gary Gereffi

Effective Crisis Response and Openness: Implications for the Trading System Pp. 321-344 in Simon Evenett, Bernard Hoekman and Olivier Cattaneo (eds.) Washington, DC and London: The World Bank and the Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)